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Did You Know?

Wake Radiology Rises Above

100-percent-board-certified ✔  100% of Wake Radiology radiologists maintain all required certifications through the American Board of Radiology.*

✔  All images are read and interpreted by a board certified, subspecialty trained radiologist.

*Most local and regional radiology options have 20% compliance with these standards. Public Policy Polling, 2012.

Badges of Honor

Wake Radiology is proud to have received the highest accreditations possible from the American College of Radiology (ACR).

Learn more about our accreditations!

Ultrasound – WR Pediatric Imaging Procedure

Ultrasound is an imaging technology that uses high frequency sound waves to view internal organs and produce diagnostic pictures of the human body. No radiation is used. Wake Radiology Pediatric Imaging Center is specially designed, equipped, and staffed to obtain high quality ultrasound examinations of pediatric patients of any size, age, and medical condition, including tiny newborns, small infants, toddlers, young children, and maturing adolescents.

peds-ultrasound

Wake Radiologist technologist during a ultrasound procedure with one of Wake Radiologist young patients.

Why would my doctor request an ultrasound?

An ultrasound exam can be used for:

  • Abdominal
  • Cranial
  • Hip
  • Kidney
  • Pelvic
  • Spine
  • Abdominal

What is an abdominal ultrasound?

An abdominal ultrasound is an ultrasound of the internal organs, including the liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, and urinary bladder. Blood flow to some of these organs also can be checked.

There are many indications for performing abdominal ultrasound including looking for a cause of belly pain, for stones in the gallbladder or kidney, or for a cause for enlargement of an abdominal organ. Pyloric stenosis, one cause of vomiting in babies, can be diagnosed with ultrasound. Appendicitis also can sometimes be diagnosed with ultrasound.

How should the patient prepare for the procedure?

It depends on what is being looked for and the age of the patient. Usually, the patient should have nothing by mouth (NPO) for a few hours before the examination. This varies with the patient’s age. Often, the referring physician will know how long the patient should be NPO. If not, call us at 919-232-4700 and ask to speak to an ultrasound technologist.

What will happen during the procedure?

The patient will lie on his or her back on an examining table. The technologist or doctor will place some warm gel (a lotion) on the patient’s belly and then look at the abdominal organs with a transducer (similar to a microphone). This will require looking at all parts of the abdomen. It usually takes less than 30 minutes.

The radiologist will generally see pictures of the liver, spleen, gallbladder, kidneys, pancreas, and urinary bladder. If indicated, blood flow to one or more organs can be looked at and pictures taken of this.

Cranial Ultrasound

What is a cranial ultrasound?
A cranial ultrasound is an ultrasound of the brain. It looks at the brain tissues and ventricles. It is usually performed on infants who still have a soft spot (called the anterior fontanelle) in their skull.

Indications for cranial ultrasound include: enlarging head circumference in a baby; screening for bleeding in the brain; especially in premature babies; looking for signs of infection; and screening for congenital abnormalities.

What will happen during the procedure?
The baby will lie on his or her back on an examining table. The technologist or doctor will put a small amount of gel (a lotion) on a transducer (similar to a microphone) and place it on the soft spot of the baby’s head. The technologist or doctor will take several pictures. You may be asked to help hold your child during the test that usually takes 15 to 30 minutes. This test looks at the structure of the brain and the size of the ventricles. This test can also look at some aspects of blood flow to the brain with a type of ultrasound called a Doppler.

Hip Ultrasound

What is a hip ultrasound?
A hip ultrasound is used to take pictures of the hips of babies to look for a dislocated or underdeveloped hip. It can be performed in babies from the newborn period to about 6 to 8 months of age.

A hip ultrasound may be needed if there is an abnormality found through physical examination of a baby’s hip, a family history of hip dysplasia, breech presentation, and for other reasons.

What will happen during the procedure?
The baby will lie on an examining table on his or her back. The technologist or doctor will place some warm gel (a lotion) on a transducer (similar to a microphone) and place it on the baby’s hip and take some pictures. Both hips will be examined. The test usually takes 30 minutes or less to perform.

Kidney Ultrasound

What is a kidney ultrasound?
A kidney ultrasound takes pictures of both kidneys and the urinary bladder. It does not test the function of the kidneys.

Indications for a kidney ultrasound include: prenatally detected abnormalities (such as hydronephrosis); urinary tract infection; blood in the urine; high blood pressure; back or abdominal pain; known or suspected kidney stones; or a family history of kidney disease. There are also some syndromes and conditions associated with kidney abnormalities for which ultrasound is performed

How should the patient prepare for the procedure?
There is generally no preparation. If the ultrasound is being performed because of blood found in the urine, a full bladder is necessary. This will require drinking several glasses of water before the examination

What will happen during the procedure?
The patient will lie on an examining table. The technologist or doctor will put warm gel (a lotion) on the patient’s lower belly and use a transducer (similar to a microphone) to look at the bladder. The technologist also will look at the upper belly and back in this way to get pictures of the kidneys. Ultrasound does not test the function of the kidneys, but it can evaluate certain aspects of blood flow. The examination usually takes 30 minutes or less.

Pelvic Ultrasound

What is a pelvic ultrasound?
A pelvic ultrasound is used to take pictures of the pelvic organs, and is usually done to look at the uterus and ovaries in a girl. It may also be used to look at the bladder. Pelvic ultrasound can also be performed on boys. Indications for pelvic ultrasound include looking for a cause of pelvic pain or searching for a possible mass.

How should the patient prepare for the procedure?
A full bladder is generally needed for this examination, which requires that the patient drink several glasses of water before arriving.

What will happen during the procedure?
The patient will lie on her or his back on an examining table. A technologist or doctor will place warm gel (a lotion) on the lower belly and then take pictures with a transducer (similar to a microphone). After the pictures are developed, the patient may go to the bathroom and empty his or her bladder.

The radiologist will see the bladder, uterus, and ovaries in girls, and the bladder and possibly prostate in boys.

Spine Ultrasound

What is a spine ultrasound?
A spine ultrasound is used to take pictures of the spinal cord in a baby who is usually 3 to 4 months old or less. A baby is usually referred for a spinal ultrasound because of a dimple, hair patch, or discoloration of the skin above the anus. The study is done to look for an abnormality of the spinal cord.

What will happen during the procedure?
The baby will lie on his or her stomach on an examining table. Sometimes a towel will be placed underneath the baby’s chest to elevate it. The technologist or doctor will place warm gel (a lotion) on a transducer (similar to a microphone), and place this on the baby’s back to take pictures. The test takes about 15 to 30 minutes. The radiologist will see if the spinal cord looks normal and if it is in the normal position.

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