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RESOURCES

Learn more about Vascular Radiology and affiliating information using Wake Radiology’s resources and online forms.

Interventional Procedures

Our vascular and interventional radiologist provide an extensive depth of expertise that ranges from conventional techniques to advanced imaging protocols. 

What our Interventional Radiologists Do

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Our Interventional Radiologists partner with physicians in many medical and surgical specialties in order to determine the most appropriate diagnostic or therapeutic treatment option for patients. Interventional radiologists will meet with a patient and discuss the treatment options available. After the patient is examined and appropriate imaging and/or lab tests are performed, the patient and his/her IR specialist will decide on therapy. During IR procedures tiny medical devices such as catheters, wires, and other micro-instruments are guided through the body under imaging guidance, usually through a tiny puncture in the skin about the size of a pen tip. By performing procedures in this manner, patients will experience less pain, lower risks, quicker recovery time, and lower costs compared to traditional surgeries.

Common Interventional Procedures

Learn about common conditions treated by our interventional radiologists.

Gastrointestinal / Biliary Interventions

Consultation

At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan. 

Abscess drain

A drainage catheter may be placed into an abscess or walled-off collection of infected fluid in order to allow the fluid to be removed. This can be accomplished with imaging guidance, including ultrasound, CT scan, or x-ray fluoroscopy. This is usually done with local anesthetic and sometimes IV medication for conscious sedation. The catheter will usually remain in place for a period of time to ensure the collection is completely treated.

Biliary drain/intervention

Bile is fluid that is produced in the liver and secreted into bowel to aid in digestion. In order to improve the flow of bile through a bile duct that is partially blocked, Interventional Radiologists can use imaging guidance to help place a drainage catheter. This allows bile to bypass the obstruction and flow into the bowel (internal drainage) and/or drain to the outside of the body into a small bag (external drainage). Ultrasound and x-ray guidance may be used in the placement of these drainage catheters. For some patients, internal stent grafts with metallic lattice may be appropriate in order to improve bile flow.

Cholecystostomy (Gallbladder Drainage)

The gallbladder functions to store bile that is produced by the liver. When the gallbladder is unable to contract well in order to squeeze the bile out into the bowel or when the gallbladder is blocked by gallstones, patients may have pain in the right upper abdomen. Fluid can build up within the gallbladder, making it swollen and sometimes infected. When removing the gallbladder by surgery is too risky or in order to allow the infection to resolve, the gallbladder can be drained with a small tube to the outside of the patient. Interventional Radiologists use imaging guidance in order to place this tube (about the size of a thin straw) directly into the gallbladder. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic x-ray guidance are typically used, and the procedure is performed with local anesthetic and IV medication for conscious sedation. The tube can be left in place until the gallbladder can be safely removed.

Gastrostomy (G) tube

A gastrostomy tube is a way to feed patients directly into the stomach when they are unable to receive adequate nutrition orally. Using minimally-invasive image-guided techniques, Interventional Radiologists are able to create a path between the stomach and skin where a tube can be inserted. Patients can then be given liquid nutrition through this catheter in order to meet their nutritional needs.

Gastrojejunostomy (GJ) tube

Sometimes, patients require a feeding tube that enters into their small bowel for their nutritional needs. They may be unable to tolerate a tube in their stomach because of backup of feedings into their esophagus. Therefore, a tube extending into the small bowel can be placed, usually from a path that enters through the skin, into the stomach, and down into the small bowel. Interventional radiologists use imaging guidance including fluoroscopic x-ray imaging and may convert a gastrostomy tube into a gastrojejunostomy tube for feedings.

GI Hemorrhage Embolization

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has a rich network of blood vessels throughout it in order to absorb nutrients after meals. Hemorrhage from some of these blood vessels into the bowel can occur with ulcers, tumors, diverticulosis, or vascular malformations. In order to quickly stop the bleeding and avoid the need for a major surgery (bowel removal), Interventional Radiologists can perform minimally-invasive embolization procedures to stop the bleeding. Different materials such as medical-grade metallic coils can be placed into the bleeding blood vessels through a long thin micro-catheter (about the size of a strand of spaghetti). These procedures are performed in the Interventional Radiology using fluoroscopic x-ray guidance while patients are partially conscious but sedated with IV medication.

Paracentesis

A paracentesis is a procedure performed to remove fluid from the abdominal cavity. Abdominal fluid may build-up due to a number of factors, including liver disease and cancer. In order to drain the fluid, imaging guidance is used. After sterile prep of the skin, skin is anesthetized or numbed. Using ultrasound guidance, a small catheter like an IV is inserted into the fluid, and the appropriate amount of fluid is drained. Sometimes the fluid is sent to the lab for testing. A bandage is placed over the skin when finished.

Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangiogram (PTC)

Typically performed in conjunction with a biliary drainage, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) imaging is performed in order to map out the anatomy of the bile ducts in the liver. Ultrasound and/or fluoroscopic x-ray guidance can be used. Patients are given local anesthetic and IV conscious sedation medication. Then, using imaging guidance, a tiny needle is inserted into one of the bile ducts of the liver. A contrast agent (x-ray dye) is injected in order to make the bile ducts visible. Images are then reviewed.

Transjugular Liver Biopsy (TJLB)

Samples of tissue from the liver (biopsy) are frequently needed for diagnostic testing. However, it is sometimes unsafe to obtain these directly through the skin into the liver, because of high bleeding risk. In these cases, a biopsy of liver tissue can be obtained by accessing the liver through the internal network of blood vessels by one of Wake Radiology’s IR doctors. Local anesthetic and IV conscious sedation are given during the procedure. Imaging guidance is then used to access a vein in the neck. Through this vein, a small sheath or tube like a large IV is placed, and then, using fluoroscopic x-ray guidance, a biopsy device is advanced into the liver through the hepatic veins. Biopsy specimens are taken and given to the pathology lab for analysis.

Genitourinary Interventions

Consultation

At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan.

Nephrostomy

A nephrostomy catheter is a small drainage tube placed percutaneously (through the skin) into the kidney in order to allow urine to drain to the outside. This can be needed for several conditions, including blockage of the kidney or ureter by a stone or tumor or build-up of infected fluid in the kidney collecting system. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology place nephrostomy catheters using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. The procedures are performed in the IR lab, with local anesthetic and intravenous medication for conscious sedation. Once a nephrostomy catheter is in place, urine will drain to the outside of the patient into a drainage bag. Some patients with nephrostomy catheters require long-term urinary drainage, and the tubes will require changing every nine to 12 weeks, performed by IR physicians.

Nephroureteral catheter

Nephroureteral catheter is similar to a nephrostomy catheter. This is a small drainage tube placed through the skin and into the kidney. Instead of having the tip at the kidney like a nephrostomy catheter, however, a nephroureteral catheter will extend down into the ureter and bladder. These tubes can be placed on a temporary basis, such as prior to stone removal by the Urologist. In this situation, they are placed by the Interventional Radiologist just before the patient goes to the operating room for stone removal by the Urologist. Different versions of the tube can be placed for a more permanent need, and these versions have holes allowing urine to drain either down into the bladder or into the drainage bag on the outside of the patient.

Ureteral stent

The ureter connects the kidney to the bladder. When a patient has a blockage of urine along the ureter, depending on the situation, a ureteral stent can be placed. If a patient has nephrostomy access into the kidney, this tube can be converted to a ureteral stent by the Interventional Radiologist. Using local anesthetic and minimal IV sedation medication, guidewires and catheters are used to achieve access into the bladder. Once the ureteral stent is working, the patient will no longer require an external tube coming out through the skin.

Varicocele Embolization

Various treatments for varicoceles include both surgical and non-surgical options. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology can perform an embolization procedure in order to block the abnormal blood vessels which are causing the varicocele. This reduces the back pressure upon the scrotal veins, allowing them to heal. This minimally-invasive procedure is performed on an outpatient basis with less risk, less pain, and shorter recovery time compared to traditional surgery. Call 919-788-1916 to schedule a consultation regarding varicocele treatment.

OB / Gynecologic Interventions

Consultation

At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan.

Ovarian Vein Embolization

Pelvic venous congestion can result in debilitating chronic pelvic pain due to swollen, engorged varicose veins deep inside the pelvis. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology can perform an ovarian vein embolization procedure in order to block the flow through the abnormally dilated pelvic veins. This thereby reduces the pressure within these veins, allowing them to heal. This minimally-invasive procedure is performed on an outpatient basis with less risk, less pain, and shorter recovery time compared to traditional laparoscopic or open surgery. Call 919-788-1916 to schedule a consultation regarding pelvic congestion syndrome treatment.

Uterine Artery Embolization

Uterine Artery Embolization / Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UAE/UFE) is performed to treat women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. These fibroids can cause a variety of symptoms, including heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain, and pelvic pressure. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology can treat uterine fibroids using minimally-invasive non-surgical image-guided techniques. After meeting with the patient and reviewing her symptoms and imaging as well as discussing treatment options, a UAE procedure may be scheduled. This procedure is performed using local anesthetic and IV medication for conscious sedation. A tiny puncture is made in the skin, and a catheter is guided through the blood vessels into the arteries that supply the uterus. Into these blood vessels, tiny particles the size of grains of sand are injected, lodging within the blood vessels and shutting off the blood supply to these tumors. Over a period of weeks to months, the tumors shrink down and symptoms are relieved. Immediately after that procedure, patients are usually kept in the hospital overnight to control any pain, cramping, or nausea. Most women can resume light activities in a couple days, returning to normal activity level in about a week.

Postpartum Hemorrhage Embolization

Excessive bleeding after childbirth is a rare but dangerous complication and is more likely to occur in women who have had cesarean sections. When the uterus does not contract adequately, the dilated blood vessels that provided the rich blood supply to the placenta can bleed freely. Interventional Radiologists can perform minimally-invasive life-saving embolization procedures in order to stop the hemorrhage and potentially avoid the need for a major surgery / hysterectomy. In the Interventional Radiology suite, a small skin puncture is made and a thin catheter is maneuvered under fluoroscopic x-ray guidance into the blood vessels that supply the uterus. Small medical particles are injected into the blood vessels in order to stop the bleeding.

Oncology Interventions

Consultation

At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan.

Biopsy

Many times, patients are found to have findings on imaging studies that require further testing. A nodule or mass detected on imaging studies or felt by the patient’s doctor may need to be biopsied. This is done in order for the tissue to be analyzed by a pathologist under the microscope. Image-guided biopsies can be performed with ultrasound guidance, CT-scan guidance, or fluoroscopic x-ray guidance. Many needle biopsies can be done on an outpatient basis, with local anesthetic.

Chemoembolization

Many patients with liver cancer may not be candidates for surgery, and IV chemotherapy may not be effective. Interventional Radiologists can play a role in the treatment of these patients by injecting certain chemotherapy medicines attached to microscopic particles directly into the blood vessels of the liver. In the Interventional Radiology suite, after local anesthetic and IV sedation medication is given, a tiny puncture is made into the artery in the groin. A thin catheter is advanced into the hepatic artery that provides part of the blood flow to the liver. Then, chemotherapy medicine attached to microscopic particles are injected. This method allows for higher doses of medicine directly at the site of the tumor, and particles lodge in the small blood vessels, keeping the medicine directly where it is needed. Patients usually stay in the hospital overnight after the procedure and are discharged the next day.

Cryoablation

Certain tumors within solid organs can be treated with surgery. Other tumors that are small enough can be treated without the need for surgery, using minimally-invasive techniques. Cryoablation is one such therapy in which extreme cold is applied directly into the tumor, permanently freezing and destroying cancer cells. Using imaging guidance such as CT scanning, Interventional Radiologists insert a thin metal probe like a thick needle directly into the tumor of the sedated patients. Then, cycles of rapid freezing and thawing are performed to ensure the tumor is completely treated. This procedure is frequently performed on an outpatient basis without the need for a major surgery.

Microwave ablation

Certain tumors within solid organs can be treated with surgery. Other tumors that are small enough and amenable can be treated without the need for surgery using minimally-invasive techniques. Microwave ablation is one such therapy that uses thermal energy heat to kill the tumor. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology can perform this procedure under imaging guidance such as CT scanning. A thin metal antenna like a thick needle is directed into the tumor while patients are sedated. Then, electromagnetic energy is applied, creating heat within the tumor. Tumor cells are then permanently killed and a major

Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)

Many patients with liver cancer may not be candidates for surgery, and IV chemotherapy may not be effective. Interventional Radiologists can play a role in the treatment of these patients by performing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT). SIRT (or radioembolization) involves injecting tiny radioactive particles directly into the blood vessels of the liver. These particles lodge in tiny blood vessels and emit radiation which kills the tumor. Careful mapping of the blood supply to the liver is needed, requiring a planning angiogram prior to the actual treatment day. On the treatment day, in the Interventional Radiology suite, after local anesthetic and IV sedation medication is given, a tiny puncture is made into the artery in the groin. A thin catheter is advanced into the hepatic artery that provides part of the blood flow to the liver. Then, microscopic radioactive particles are injected. These will admit radiation directly into the tumor and allow for a much higher dose of radiation than traditional radiation therapy.

Paracentesis

A paracentesis is a procedure performed to remove fluid from the abdominal cavity. Abdominal fluid may build-up due to a number of factors, including liver disease and cancer. In order to drain the fluid, imaging guidance is used. After sterile prep of the skin, skin is anesthetized or numbed. Using ultrasound guidance, a small catheter like an IV is inserted into the fluid, and the appropriate amount of fluid is drained. Sometimes the fluid is sent to the lab for testing. A bandage is placed over the skin when finished.

Port

When chemotherapy, IV nutrition, or long-term IV antibiotics are needed, a port or other long-term venous access catheter is placed. This allows access into the bloodstream in the large central veins of the chest. Wake Radiology Interventional Physicians use imaging guidance and minimally-invasive techniques to place these catheters, without the need for surgery. Patients are given local anesthetic and usually IV medication for conscious sedation. The appropriate vein is chosen, and the catheter is placed with the tip in a large central chest vein. The port is secured under the skin, with only a small incision visible. After placement, whenever patients need to receive their medications, the port is accessed with a thin needle, avoiding the need for multiple attempts at starting an IV.

Thoracentesis

A thoracentesis is a procedure performed to remove fluid from around the lung. Fluid can build up around the lung due to any number of factors, including infection, cancer, or surgery. In order to allow the lung to re-aerate and allow patients to breathe easier, the fluid can be removed using imaging guidance. Once the fluid is localized under ultrasound guidance, the skin is sterilized and anesthetized or numbed. Through the numb area, a small catheter like an IV is placed into the fluid using ultrasound guidance. The appropriate amount of fluid is removed. Some of the fluid may be sent to the lab for testing. Once the fluid is removed, a small bandage is placed, and a chest x-ray is usually performed.

Tunneled drainage catheter

The PleurX system is a method for removing fluid that continues to build up in the chest or abdomen on a steady basis. These catheters are placed by Interventional Radiologists under local anesthetic and IV medication for conscious sedation. The catheter will be placed into the appropriate location in the fluid and will be left in place. Patients are then able to drain the fluid from time to time at home, without having to come to the hospital or office for drainage.

Pain Interventions

Consultation

At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan.

Kyphoplasty / Vertebroplasty

Many patients with osteoporosis who have suffered a vertebral compression fracture maybe candidates for a non-surgical minimally-invasive treatment to stabilize the fracture and alleviate pain. Interventional Radiologists at Wake Radiology will meet with patients who have suffered a vertebral compression fracture. Depending on patient conditions, timing of the fracture, and imaging appearance, the patient may be a candidate for a Kyphoplasty or Vertebroplasty procedure, either on an outpatient or inpatient basis. During the procedure, patients are sedated, and, through small punctures in the sterilized skin, thin metal tubes like large needles are inserted into the bone to the site of the fracture, using fluoroscopic x-ray guidance. With Kyphoplasty, a balloon is inflated to create a cavity in the bone, but with Vertebroplasty, no cavity is created. For both procedures, bone cement is injected into the site of the fracture, thereby stabilizing the bone. Many patients experience pain relief very quickly after the procedure, and outpatients are usually discharged several hours after the procedure.

Sacroplasty

Weakened bones in the back part of the lower pelvis near the tailbone may be prone to fractures, called sacral insufficiency fractures. The bone fragments in these fractures are not separated, but the fractures can cause significant pain. Similar to other minimally-invasive techniques in the spine, Interventional Radiologists can treat these fractures by infusing a bone cement to stabilize the fracture site. Patients are sedated for these procedures, and then using x-ray or CT guidance, thin metal tubes like large needles are inserted into the bone. Bone cement is injected and quickly hardens, stabilizing the fracture and alleviating the pain.

Radiofrequency (RF) Ablation

The majority of patients with cancer that has spread to the bones suffer with some degree of pain. When cancer has spread to the bones, treatment is focused on alleviating patients’ symptoms, rather than trying to cure the cancer. Radiation therapy provided by radiation oncologists is the standard treatment for painful bone tumors. However, sometimes radiation can no longer be given due to certain limitations. Interventional Radiologists can treat painful bone tumors with minimally-invasive image-guided techniques such as radiofrequency (RF) ablation. During RF ablation procedures, patients are sedated, and imaging guidance such a CT scanning is used to allow the Interventional Radiologist to position a probe (or thick needle) into the tumor. Radiofrequency energy is applied, thereby heating the tumor and killing tumor cells. If stabilization of the weakened bone is needed, a bone cement can be injected in conjunction with RF ablation to attempt to minimize the risk of a fracture later. RF ablation procedures are frequently performed on an outpatient basis, during which patients are discharged several hours after the procedure.

Other Services

Image-guided joint injections and other similar therapeutic and diagnostic procedures using fluoroscopic x-ray, ultrasound, and CT Imaging are performed by fellowship-trained board-certified Musculoskeletal Radiologists at Wake Radiology

Vascular Interventions

Consultation
At Wake Radiology, our Interventional Radiologists will meet with patients to discuss their symptoms and health history, as well as review any pertinent imaging prior to determining the best treatment options. Prior to any minimally-invasive procedure, the physician will discuss expected outcomes, risks, and alternative therapies with the patient and their family. The referring doctor will be updated regarding the treatment plan.

Angiography

Angiography is a method of medical imaging performed to analyze blood vessels. During a traditional angiogram, a contrast agent (x-ray dye) is directly injected into the blood vessels of interest and the x-ray images are obtained so that the blood vessels are visible. The contrast agent is injected through a needle or tiny tube (catheter) into the blood vessels of Interest. The procedure is performed by our Wake Radiology IR physicians with local anesthetic or numbing medicine at the skin and usually IV medication for conscious sedation. When non-invasive imaging is appropriate, angiographic images can be obtained with CT scanning (called CTA) or MRI (called MRA) techniques and performed at one of our Wake Radiology Imaging Centers, supervised and interpreted by our diagnostic radiologists.

Angioplasty / Stent

When a blood vessel is blocked or narrowed by any of a number of conditions, that blood vessel can be re-expanded using a balloon, called angioplasty, improving blood flow to the tissues past the narrowing. A metallic stent can also be used to re-expand the blood vessel, and this stent stays in place after the procedure. Interventions such as angioplasty and stenting have replaced open surgery in many situations, leading to faster recovery times and decreased pain and discomfort.

Dialysis Access

When kidney failure requires that a patient receive dialysis treatments on a short-term or long-term basis, catheters can be placed in order to allow immediate access into the bloodstream for dialysis. Wake Radiology Interventional Physicians use imaging guidance and minimally-invasive techniques to place these catheters, without the need for surgery. Patients are given local anesthetic and usually IV medication for conscious sedation. The appropriate vein is chosen, and the catheter is placed so that the tip is in a large central chest vein (to accommodate rapid flow of blood from the dialysis machines).

Embolization

When a blood vessel is bleeding or there is a need to decrease the blood flow to a certain organ or tissue in the body, Interventional Radiologists can use minimally-invasive image-guided techniques to stop the hemorrhage or decrease the blood flow. Wake Radiology IR physicians use a number of different materials or devices to perform an embolization, avoiding the need for an open surgery. As part of the procedure, an angiogram is performed in order to visualize the blood vessels, and then the appropriate device or material is injected in order to “plug up” the blood vessel.

Endovenous Laser Treatment (EVLT)

There are several options for treating venous insufficiency, which can be the source of varicose veins in the lower limbs. Minimally-invasive endovenous techniques, specifically EndoVenous Laser Treatments (EVLT), have largely replaced higher risk surgical procedures, such as vein stripping. The thin EVLT probe is placed into the vein under ultrasound guidance. Then, laser energy is activated in the probe to cauterize and seal the entire vein. Our Interventional Radiologists can perform EVLT procedures in our outpatient office with minimal sedation medication and local anesthesia to numb the tissues.

IVC filter

When a patient suffers with a DVT (deep vein thrombosis – usually blood clots in the legs) but is unable to receive anticoagulants (blood thinners), an IVC filter can be placed. The IVC (Inferior Vena Cava) is the large vein in the abdomen through which blood travels from the lower limbs and pelvis back up to the heart. In order to protect the heart and lungs from blood clots traveling up from the legs, our Interventional Radiologists can place a cone-shaped filter device into the IVC. Using minimally-invasive image-guided techniques, Wake Radiology’s IR physicians guide a small catheter less than 1/4 inch diameter through a small skin puncture into the appropriate vein. Once correctly positioned, the filter is released and stays in position in the body. It can be removed at a later date once the DVT has resolved or the patient can receive blood thinners.

Microphlebectomy

Several treatments for varicose veins exist, including removal of the unsightly veins. With microphlebectomy, after skin and tissues are anesthetized, tiny cuts in the skin near the veins are made. Then, small instruments are used to remove the abnormal veins. This procedure is part of comprehensive vein care provided by Wake Radiology’s Interventional Vein Specialists.

Sclerotherapy

One treatment method for eliminating varicose veins and spider veins is sclerotherapy, using an FDA-approved chemical agent to close up the abnormal veins. In this procedure, a tiny needle is used to inject the chemical directly into the veins. The vein walls seal together, and no more blood can fill into the bulging veins. Wake Radiology’s Interventional Physicians perform this procedure on an outpatient basis at our IR office.

Transjugular Liver Biopsy (TJLB)

Samples of tissue from the liver (biopsy) are frequently needed for diagnostic testing. However, it is sometimes unsafe to obtain these directly through the skin into the liver, because of high bleeding risk. In these cases, a biopsy of liver tissue can be obtained by accessing the liver through the internal network of blood vessels by one of Wake Radiology’s IR doctors. Local anesthetic and IV conscious sedation are given during the procedure. Imaging guidance is then used to access a vein in the neck. Through this vein, a small sheath or tube like a large IV is placed, and then, using fluoroscopic x-ray guidance, a biopsy device is advanced into the liver through the hepatic veins. Biopsy specimens are taken and given to the pathology lab for analysis.

Vascular access

When chemotherapy, IV nutrition, or long-term IV antibiotics are needed, a portor other long-term venous access catheter is placed. This allows access into the bloodstream in the large central veins of the chest. Wake Radiology Interventional Physicians use imaging guidance and minimally-invasive techniques to place these catheters, without the need for surgery. Patients are giving local anesthetic and usually IV medication for conscious sedation. The appropriate vein is chosen, and the catheter is placed with the tip in a large central vein. Ports are secured under the skin, with only a small incision visible. Other types of catheters extend out through the skin, able to be connected to IV medication infusion systems.

Venous Sampling

Sometimes, blood from very specific veins deep within the body, such as the adrenal veins, is needed to be tested in order to assess for overproduction of certain hormones. Wake Radiology IR physicians are able to carefully maneuver tiny micro catheters (thin medical tubes) deep into the body using fluoroscopic x-ray guidance, through only a tiny skin puncture. These catheters are guided through the body’s veins, and then blood is removed from the appropriate vein deep in the body for testing.

Venography

Venography is a specific type of angiography during which only the veins are imaged. During a traditional venogram, a contrast agent (x-ray dye) is directly injected into the veins of interest, and the x-ray images are taken so that the veins can be seen. The contrast agent is injected through a needle or tiny tube (catheter) into the veins of Interest. The procedure is performed by our Wake Radiology IR physicians with local anesthetic or numbing medicine at the skin and usually IV medication for conscious sedation. When non-invasive Imaging is appropriate, venography images can be obtained with CT scan (called CTV) or MRI (called MRV) techniques and performed at one of our Wake Radiology Imaging Centers, supervised and interpreted by our diagnostic radiologists.

Make an Appointment

The Wake Radiology outpatient Interventional Radiology office is located at 4301 Lake Boone Trail, across the street from Rex Hospital. Some of our procedures are performed in this office. Inpatient procedures and some of our more involved outpatient procedures are performed at Rex Hospital. Pre-procedure consultation for outpatients and post-procedure follow-up visits will occur at our outpatient office.

Wake Radiology Interventional Physicians are available for consultation on an inpatient and outpatient basis. Outpatients may schedule a consultation with us at our outpatient office by calling 919-788-1916 or having their referring provider schedule an appointment. Referring providers with inpatients who may need one of our services may contact us in the hospitals we staff.

EASY SCHEDULING

Our scheduling team is available to answer questions about imaging procedures and insurance as well as assist in promptly scheduling your appointment. Contact our team by calling 919-232-4700

CONVENIENT LOCATION

Wake Radiology offers convenient office locations throughout greater Triangle including Raleigh, Cary, Garner, Wake Forest, and Chapel Hill with parking just steps away from check-in. 

INSURANCE

Wake Radiology is a participating provider for most major managed care insurance plans. We provide imaging services and file claims on behalf of all patients, including those with out-of-network insurance plans where a higher cost share may apply. Learn more about insurance.

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